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Part 7 - Relaxation

Yoga With Alexis - Part 7: Relaxation - Yoga Nidra

Part 7 - Relaxation

 

At the end of Yoga sessions is a quiet peaceful period of time for the children and adults to relax, rest and rejuvenate. This helps the body and mind to find some stillness after moving, chanting, breathing deeply etc. It's a very important part of every yoga session we do because it allows the body to fully absorb the fruits of all of the practice leading up to it, and to rest before moving onto the next activity. There are many ways to practice Yoga Nidra or deep relaxation, but the child is usually (ideally) by this point lying down on the floor supine if comfortable. The Yoga Nidra is often practised in a dark room with low lighting, the child or children can have a pillow to support the head, a blanket, possibly even eye bags, and they are invited to close their eyes and relax. You may like to play some quiet relaxation music but sounds want to be kept to a minimum to avoid over stimulation, we are working towards becoming detached from the senses and resting in quiet, still conscious awareness. When everyone in the room is settled we begin the practice of Yoga Nidra. It starts for most people by setting an intention for the practice in the present tense such as 'I am peaceful' or 'I am calm' and then we may scan the body from head to toe, being conscious of all of the body. If you have any singing bowls or instruments that can make pleasant sounds or find videos or CDs to play that can help aid to set up a relaxing atmosphere it is very good to do so, particularly for those who aren't registering words, however even if you are using language to guide body awareness, by continuing to guide the session with a soft gentle tone of voice, the children are still receiving the benefits of your calm guidance, even if the language isn't being recognised. Alternatively, when mentioning parts of the body, you could gently make contact, rub or squeeze the area of the body that is being mentioned and focused on to bring more attention and awareness  to that part of the body (i.e. when mentioning right shoulder, placing your hand gently on the child's right shoulder).

 

Every child is different and all are wonderfully unique magnificent human beings that all deserve the benefits of Yoga whether they have special needs or not, and it is down to us as parents, carers, guardians, teachers, practitioners etc. to ensure that they feel the best they can and thrive as the wonderful human being that they are, and that means we deserve the loving kindness we share with them also so taking care of ourselves and enjoying the practice is very important for our own well-being and the well-being of each child. It is with each child that we must do our best to adapt these practises and tailor them specifically to the child's needs so each pose and posture looks different for each and every child, and each child benefits from different movements and exercises. I hope that this can help to bring more comfort, stillness and peace to your lives, and to the lives of your children in these uncertain and changing times.

 

From my heart to yours

 

Namaste 💚🙏

 

 

River Flute by Kevin MacLeod

Link httpsincompetech.filmmusic.iosong4713-river-flute

License httpcreativecommons.orglicensesby4.0

Yoga With Alexis - Part 7: Relaxation - Sound Bath & Tongue Drums

Part 7 - Relaxation

 

At the end of Yoga sessions is a quiet peaceful period of time for the children and adults to relax, rest and rejuvenate. This helps the body and mind to find some stillness after moving, chanting, breathing deeply etc. It's a very important part of every yoga session we do because it allows the body to fully absorb the fruits of all of the practice leading up to it, and to rest before moving onto the next activity. There are many ways to practice Yoga Nidra or deep relaxation, but the child is usually (ideally) by this point lying down on the floor supine if comfortable. The Yoga Nidra is often practised in a dark room with low lighting, the child or children can have a pillow to support the head, a blanket, possibly even eye bags, and they are invited to close their eyes and relax. You may like to play some quiet relaxation music but sounds want to be kept to a minimum to avoid over stimulation, we are working towards becoming detached from the senses and resting in quiet, still conscious awareness. When everyone in the room is settled we begin the practice of Yoga Nidra. It starts for most people by setting an intention for the practice in the present tense such as 'I am peaceful' or 'I am calm' and then we may scan the body from head to toe, being conscious of all of the body. If you have any singing bowls or instruments that can make pleasant sounds or find videos or CDs to play that can help aid to set up a relaxing atmosphere it is very good to do so, particularly for those who aren't registering words, however even if you are using language to guide body awareness, by continuing to guide the session with a soft gentle tone of voice, the children are still receiving the benefits of your calm guidance, even if the language isn't being recognised. Alternatively, when mentioning parts of the body, you could gently make contact, rub or squeeze the area of the body that is being mentioned and focused on to bring more attention and awareness  to that part of the body (i.e. when mentioning right shoulder, placing your hand gently on the child's right shoulder).

 

Every child is different and all are wonderfully unique magnificent human beings that all deserve the benefits of Yoga whether they have special needs or not, and it is down to us as parents, carers, guardians, teachers, practitioners etc. to ensure that they feel the best they can and thrive as the wonderful human being that they are, and that means we deserve the loving kindness we share with them also so taking care of ourselves and enjoying the practice is very important for our own well-being and the well-being of each child. It is with each child that we must do our best to adapt these practises and tailor them specifically to the child's needs so each pose and posture looks different for each and every child, and each child benefits from different movements and exercises. I hope that this can help to bring more comfort, stillness and peace to your lives, and to the lives of your children in these uncertain and changing times.

 

From my heart to yours

 

Namaste 💚🙏

 

 

River Flute by Kevin MacLeod

Link httpsincompetech.filmmusic.iosong4713-river-flute

License httpcreativecommons.orglicensesby4.0

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